The ONLY 5 Options for Digital & Social Marketing Execution & Results

 

Something I added recently to my keynote speeches if my audience is small businesses or entrepreneurs…

I realized that I was perhaps implicitly giving the audience the idea that anyone could do this stuff easily and quickly.

As you may know if you’ve started the digital or social marketing learning curve, it’s a long path and a big mountain- with many paths, really.

Your company has only 5 options for digital and social marketing (if you want noticeable business results)…

To be sure you have someone who can really drive business results:

  1. Sacrifice your own hobbies, free time and families to spend 20-40 hours a week learning for 3 years (why do you think all the job listings ask for a minimum amount of experience?)
  2. Hire someone with no experience and wait 3 years for them to have significant experience and expertise.
  3. Hire expert employees, experienced at ad platforms or analytics: $50-80K per year each – you’re going to need several to cover all the areas of expertise you need.
  4. Hire an expert agency: $30-60K per year (they can keep the costs down by having Tmultiple experts on staff more efficiently to cover multiple clients)
  5. Do nothing, don’t take advantage of online marketing and lose to competitors who leverage digital expertise.

Notice- what is not an option is: Do a whole bunch of random things you read on social media blogs… with no experience, no analytics, no skills… I mean you CAN do that, if you don’t want to create any real impact. But if you want to drive new customers, sales and profits, you need expertise.

Do you want to become a social media expert? Great- which platforms?

Facebook ad experts get hired for having several years of experience and paid at least $30/hour- often $40-50k and up.

You can check out indeed.com for salaries…

Google AdWords experts get paid the same or more- and it takes years to get great at that. Which is more complicated- AdWords or FB ads? They’re both crazy!

Google Analytics? Same story- the learning curve and pay…

So that’s just three areas of expertise, three paths- that for any one small business owner to mount? It’s formidable. And this is one reason so many SMB’s struggle to do it themselves.

Not everybody has the discipline, talent for math, tolerance for or love of geekery and analysis etc to do ads or analytics well, and those that don’t end up struggling by trying to just to the fun or easy parts of social media. The results aren’t so great.

No business has a lot of options until they’re profitable. Once you have profits, though, I highly encourage you to stop wearing so many hats and start doing only what you do best, start become a leader and specializing in management. Learn to be a better leader. Delegate.

In many cases that means letting go of marketing.

I’ve seen some business owners refuse to do this.

After all- they got themselves THIS far, right?

They must be good at it, right?

They might be ok- but they may not be great.

So many athletes are great in high school and make it to college but end up on the bench. Or make it to the pros but wash out quickly.

At some point you hit the maximum of your ability at a thing- and that might be because it’s not really your ZONE of GENIUS. It might not really be YOUR THING.

What if YOUR THING in your company is something else, and you are neglecting that, and hurting your marketing at the same time, by not doing your thing, and doing marketing poorly instead?

SMB leaders also go through growing pains at management and leadership (I’ve gone through this myself!) because we aren’t trained in it and we start out alone and if we’re successful we get help but we never planned to be managers or CEO’s. We may not have had exposure to great leadership. We don’t know how to do it. We make all kinds of mistakes.

So you have to start learning to be a manager and a leader. And it’s hard.

And part of that is learning to outsource and delegate and hire. You have to hire contractors or employees and/or vendor partners.

There are growing pains.

You have to learn to let go.

You might realize you’re a micromanager even though you always hated being micromanaged and you never meant to micromanage anything. That happened to me. I didn’t intend for it to happen, but it happened. My first clue was when I had to ask myself why my people weren’t solving more problems for themselves- had I disempowered them?

If you hate letting other people do something poorly and slowly that you could get done way faster, it’s easy to become overbearing and to micromanage.

It takes patience and empathy to grow your team’s potential.

It’s tough.

But if you don’t learn to be a leader and delegate and let go, you will never grow beyond a certain point.

So many SMB’s never do. And it can be frustrating to be stuck at that level if you want to someday get to a point where things are easier for you!

The law of the lid: your company can’t grow any bigger than your leadership ability.

So start looking at your real strengths: what you do best that no one else can do.

And let go of everything else.

Delegate it.

Hire out for it.

Let go.

So you can grow.

2018 Marketing Director Survey Part 1/2

If you aren’t aware of it, some amazing people have been putting out a great survey for a number of years. It’s called The CMO Survey, and it asks marketing directors, VP’s of marketing and others key questions to figure out what’s going on with marketing and where we’re headed. We wanted to bring more awareness not just to the great work done by Christine Moorman, her team and those at Deloitte, Duke’s Fuqua School of Business, and the American Marketing Association, but also to the trends uncovered by the latest survey.

We, of course, had some of our own opinions and insights to add on the topics in the survey based on our work in digital marketing and social media over the last 19 years… and it took us 2 hours to get through it all! We put the discussion into two videos. We hope to piece them into smaller topic videos soon.

For now, here is part one of two. Go here for part two.

Discussion by the Brian Carter Group. This podcast is not directly affiliated with CMO Survey. All registered copyrights and trademarks remain the property of original owners.

How To Bridge The Offline/Online Customer Experience Successfully

Nowadays, the average customer journey can be rather complicated. Consumers expect retail experiences that are smooth, seamless, and most importantly, omnichannel. As a result, retailers must look at how they can optimize their strategies to offer a holistic presence – bringing together both online and offline operations.

Econsultancy tells us that “nearly 40% of online searchers make a purchase after being influenced by an offline channel”. In maintaining an online and offline presence, it can sometimes prove challenging trying to connect the two. With that in mind, here are some tips for bridging the offline/online customer experience successfully.

 

Keeping things consistent

This first point is perhaps an obvious one, but it bears reinforcing. A big part of connecting the online and offline experience is consistency: in design, branding, and messaging. It’s often the case that a customer may see your advertising out in the real world before searching online to find out more. If your branding doesn’t match up, your credibility will take a hit.

Consumers expect consistency each time they encounter your business. Even if selling online doesn’t form a big part of what you do, a professional-looking ecommerce website that fits with the rest of your communications is essential. It doesn’t have to be a big endeavor, these days. On-brand imagery, language and ease of use are the most important factors.

Cosmetics retailer Lush is a good example. Observe the visual similarities in their online and offline branding below – font choices, color scheme, etc.

There’s something about mobile

As we’ve discussed, modern consumers use a variety of channels to make their purchases today. But one of the biggest things that can get in the way of this is mobile experience. More than half of us still find it cumbersome to complete a transaction on a mobile device, and around the same percentage of retailers fail to optimize their websites for tablets.

On top of that, a growing number of people are keen to take advantage of the opportunity to use their mobile phones while visiting a store, whether that’s to check if what they want is in stock, save money with real-time promotions, or earn extra loyalty points. As yet, most retailers don’t offer this service, so those that do have a distinct competitive advantage.

Shopify users will find that exploring functionality like geo targeting is not as complicated as you might think. For $10 a month, the Geo Targeting app integrates with your store to target offers, news and coupon codes at certain locations. The more visual and eye-catching you can make these notifications, the better.

 

The case for vanity URLs

A vanity URL is a shortened version of your web address that’s easier for customers to remember. They’re mostly used for offline advertisements, such as billboards and posters, so people won’t struggle to recall the website at a later date. What’s more, you can track this URL to judge the effectiveness of your offline advertising efforts.

Once someone has landed on your vanity URL page, you can then look to retarget those users digitally if they failed to convert the first time around. Vanity URLs are also easier to share and perceived as more trustworthy.

Below are some examples of what a vanity URL might look like. You can find out how to set one up for your landing page here.

  • fashionwebsite.com/categories/womens/dresses/party-dresses becomes www.fashionwebsite.com/party-dresses
  • mymusicwebsite.com/events/live-gigs/chicago-street-party-2018 becomes www.mymusicwebsite.com/street-party
  • welovecats.com/cat-breeds/maine-coon/how-to-care-for-your-maine-coon becomes www.welovecats.com/maine-coon-care

 

Why you should be collecting data regularly

Whether offline or online, it’s important to know the best way to contact your customers. While it’s always recommended to collect a name and email when people buy from you online, asking for too much personal information in one go can be offputting – potentially enough to risk an abandoned shopping cart.

So make creating an account optional, and make use of those email addresses to send each new customer a thank you email, along with an incentive to complete a short survey about their shopping experience. That initial contact could lead to a series of feedback requests that help you improve your customer experience, both online and off. Good retailers understand the importance of reputation management – and if you wanted to bring the same ethos in-store, you might want to consider targeted smartphone notifications, surveys that can be filled out via tablet as customers exit the store, or comment cards.

Creating engagement through social media

Finally, your social media strategy can play a big role in engaging customers, whether they shop online or in-store. Even if they don’t visit your website, chances are if they shop with you regularly, they at least follow your social media channels. It’s a great way to remind them about offers, events, new releases, and your company ethos. Never underestimate the power of a good UGC campaign – the ultimate way to bring offline experiences into the online world.

 

In summary, keep in mind that today’s consumers do not see distinct shopping channels. Rather, they will have an overall view of your brand that’s informed by their experiences across multiple touchpoints. A unified approach is key, as the online/offline worlds will only continue to merge.

3 Simple Steps to Build a Social Media Marketing Sales Funnel

Originally posted on SME

Are you looking for a smart way to use social channels for lead conversion?

Are you tracking and leveraging your target customers’ path to buying your product?

Collecting fans and followers is one thing, converting them to paying customers can be quite another. That is, unless you have a customized sales funnel in place.

In this article you’ll discover how to put together a marketing and sales funnel with the right channels and key trackable metrics. You’ll also find advice on how to test and tweak your funnel for maximum boost.

Why Is Your Marketing and Sales Funnel Such a Big Deal?

Social media marketing is about using social networks and tools to guide prospects through a series of steps–a funnel–to get them to take the actions you want (e.g., becoming a fan, sharing their email address or buying your products or services).

There are tons of social media tools, networks and options that include everything from Facebook and Twitter to landing pages and email marketing to SEO and ads. Each of these social marketing channels is one more way to guide your prospects through your sales funnel.

marketing channels

Use varied social marketing channels to guide your prospects through your sales funnel.

With all of these marketing channels at your disposal, how do you decide which ones fit within your sales funnel?

To answer those questions, you have to know who your potential customers are and how you can reach them most effectively. You also have to know your company’s goals, how you’ll measure those goals (i.e., the metrics you’ll analyze) and what your target numbers are for those metrics.

Without those key facts, your marketing and sales funnel will be skewed. Excessive focus on one part of your funnel can cause problems elsewhere. If you focus only on owned media like follower numbers and email addresses, you may have trouble with conversions. Or, if you only focus on brand awareness and neglect email marketing, you’ll likely miss out on sales.

Every decision you make about how to create brand awareness, garner engagement and make conversions and sales should be a reflection of your funnel.

The rest of this article shows you how to build, track and test your marketing and sales funnel to give your company the big results it wants.

#1: Define and Implement Channels and Jobs

Did I mention you have a ton of social marketing tools at your disposal? Frankly, it can be overwhelming to think about using all of them at once as part of your marketing and sales funnel. So don’t.

Start by determining what your high-level sales path should look like. In the example a little further down, I’m using Awareness, Repeat Visibility and Engagement and Sales.

Next, prioritize the social channels and tools your audience is already using and that you’re familiar with, then organize those by their primary function (or job). For example, Facebook is great for raising awareness and driving leads, but not for converting sales. Email blasts are excellent for conversions, but not awareness.

As you’re deciding which marketing channels go where in your funnel, consider which ones are most relevant to your short-term and long-term goals, what each channel’s strengths and weaknesses are and what job you’re expecting that channel to do.

marketing funnel concept

Use your funnel to organize your channels and hold each accountable for its role in the process.

As you see in the illustration above, you may have channels that overlap; for instance, different kinds of social ads in the Awareness part of the funnel. In addition, each channel may have different facets (e.g., Facebook ads versus Facebook fans). Each facet builds upon its own functions, as well as the functions of other networks, to lead to your ultimate goal: sales.

Your funnel should be stable, but not inflexible. If your company cares more about email marketing than its number of followers, adjust your tactics accordingly.

For example, instead of using Facebook ads to increase brand awareness and gain more fans, jump straight to an ad campaign targeted at list building. Create an ad that sends leads to an optimized landing page on your website where you ask them to share their email address to access content, a download, etc.

#2: Assign and Measure Key Metrics

Any bottlenecks in your funnel will slow your momentum or stop it completely. Depending on where the bottleneck happens, you could miss out on brand awareness opportunities, growing your owned media lists or conversions and sales.

To measure the health of your funnel, you need to assign key metrics to each stage. That usually looks something like this:

marketing funnel channel metrics

Set a key metric for each tactic in each part of your funnel to quickly diagnose where the funnel is anemic.

With your key metrics in place, look at each tactic in each funnel section and set any industry benchmark standards.

Use these benchmarks to compare your company to your competitors and your industry as a whole. How do you stack up? Look at which of your tactics and funnel sections are best or worst compared to industry averages and adjust as needed.

Speaking of benchmarks and comparing, are you making the most of your analytics and tracking what you need to track? Awareness metrics, Facebook Insights and Google Analytics all have flaws, but I have a few tips for you.

If you’re tracking awareness, I suggest looking at impressions instead of reach. Tools like AdWords don’t give reach data and Facebook’s reach data is inaccurate.

Have you noticed that you’re getting inconsistent results from your Facebook Insights? Start exporting your Insights data to an Excel spreadsheet so you can consistently track and compare the right metrics and get a better idea of how your tactics are working long-term.

You’re probably using Google Analytics on your website, but if you’re not using the Google URL Builder or event tracking, you’re missing out on a lot of useful data. Google URL Builder allows you to customize URLs for posts and ads so you can track visitors from social networks and how they move through your site.

yoast wordpress plugin

Yoast’s Google Analytics WordPress plugin tracks events.

Event tracking gives you information about button or link clicks, which is especially useful if customers have to go offsite to buy your product. If you have a WordPress site, you can even install this plugin that automatically creates event tracking for you!

#3: Test and Tweak, Then Test Again

The number-one thing you can do to boost your results is test everything. Every good idea you think of is something to test.

As you test, always think in terms of your key metrics and make use of your analytics to find out what works and what doesn’t. Let’s use Facebook as an example.

You can constantly test your Facebook success by trying a variety of status updates. Which has the best engagement rate—photos, text, links or video? Does your audience prefer news or funny videos or memes? Take the time to analyze your previous and current posts to see what worked and what didn’t.

If you want to find your engagement rate for a given post, I suggest dividing its total engagement (likes, shares, comments, clicks, etc.) by total post impressions. If you’re using Facebook ads, the Facebook ad display algorithm shows which posts get the most engagement.

post engagement metrics

Pay attention to which posts your fans respond to.

The key is to look at your best and your worst posts. In both instances, keep an eye out for differences in post type, topic, colors, sentiment, message and graphic style.

What do your 10 most engaging posts have in common? What do your 10 least engaging posts have in common? Just knowing the commonalities of those top and bottom posts can help you dramatically boost your post engagement.

When I went through this exercise for a client, their page had a month-over-month increase of seven times as many likes, comments and shares and 31 times as many link clicks!

Are you using ads? Then you definitely need to be testing!

Ads burn out fast, so it’s important to create and test ads weekly. If you have the budget for it, you can create, test and optimize new ads three times a week or more.

If you’re using AdWords, create new ads until the point of diminishing returns. Check actual search phrases to see if you need more negative keywords. If your AdWords manager is slacking, get an AdWords Audit.

google adwords

Do you use Google AdWords?

Not sure which channel ads to spend money on? Compare your options. Run Facebook, Twitter and even Reddit ads to see which works best for your audience and gives you the best awareness or conversions for your money.

A Quick Note About Content Calendars

A lot of brands use a content calendar to create a month of posts (for Facebook, Google+ or any other channel) ahead of time and then submit it for review. This seems organized and diligent, but in practice I believe this approach makes you less likely to improve your posts and get better results.

Every month you need to analyze your key metrics and learn from any mistakes. It’s hard to implement those lessons when you’ve already assigned content for the next month (without the benefit of analysis).

In place of content calendars, I recommend submitting examples of types of posts you want to test or creating your posts daily, or at least weekly.

Conclusion

Customers like to make decisions on their own terms. In most cases, they’re looking for a relationship with a company, not necessarily a hard sell. You can use this human nature to your advantage.

Take note of the social channels your audience is using most, then use those channels to guide them through your sales process.

Set up a funnel that allows leads to jump in wherever they need to. If your funnel is stable but flexible, you’ll be able to adjust its use to fit your customers’ behaviors and needs—and make sales.

Your biggest sales results will come from constant measuring and testing. Be prepared to make changes quickly and match your customers’ reactions to your efforts. You’ll be seeing intensified results in no time.

12 Mobile Marketing Stats You Can’t Afford To Ignore

80% of internet users own a smartphone. (Smart Insights)

Smartphones have beaten magazines and newspapers and aren’t far behind radio (eMarketer)

71% of marketers believe mobile marketing is core to their business. (Salesforce)

By 2019, mobile advertising will represent 72% of all US digital ad spending. (Marketing Land)

Consumer time spent on mobile is increasing while time spent with all other media is decreasing (eMarketer)

Mobile time is mostly APP time, NOT mobile web usage (eMarketer)

Apps account for 89% of mobile media time, with the other 11% spent on websites. (Smart Insights)

People are spending over 3 hours a day in apps, and only 50 minutes on the mobile web. (GeoMarketing)

57% of users say they won’t recommend a business with a poorly designed mobile site. (CMS Report)

Google says 61% of users are unlikely to return to a mobile site they had trouble accessing and 40% visit a competitor’s site instead. (McKinsey & Company)

70% Of Consumers Delete Emails Immediately That Don’t Render Well On A Mobile Device (Blue Hornet)

 

REPLAY: Why Retargeting is Even More Important than Email Marketing [Facebook Live Show]

Episode OCHO of Live Online Learning (LOL):

To be sure not to miss future live shows, opt in here to join the email list so we can keep you notified!

Here’s what we talked about, in addition to attendee live questions we answered:

 

  • What is retargeting?

 

      • It’s the best way to stay visible to your hottest leads and best potential customers. It’s a best practice to getting quicker revenue and profits.
      • Retargeting is when ads follow you around- have you ever viewed a site or product and then you see it everywhere? It’s stalking you!
      • Showing ads to people who’ve been on your website or viewed one of your products or services- if you include custom lists it’s also visibility to your opt in email lists and contacts

 

  • Why retarget?

 

      • Owned marketing- these are people who are now in your audience, similar to email subscribers or fans or followers- they haven’t opted into a list but they did show interest.
      • How few people buy or take action right away
        • What’s your bounce rate? That means the % of people who only view on page on your website and leave right away. The average site has about 50% of visitors bounce, without viewing a second page. For many sites it’s as high as 70-90%. Many businesses haven’t optimized their websites behaviorally to get users to stick around and view multiple pages. Retargeting is a great way to bring them back.
        • What’s your ecomm conv rate? 1-2% Reverse it. 98-99%. That’s the % of people you’re losing who forget about you within 1-3 days. Retargeting keeps you top of mind.
        • What’s your email or lead gen opt in rate?  3%-20% Reverse it. 80-97% That’s the % of people you’re losing who forget about you within 1-3 days. Retargeting keeps you top of mind.
        • If you’re working hard or paying to get that traffic, how do you feel about losing most of the people and them promptly forgetting about you? It sucks, right? Retargeting fixes this.
      • Retargeting is like email but better
        • Do you email market? Have you grown a list and done follow up emails to them?
        • Only 20-30% of people open emails
        • 97% of people use cookies, don’t block them, and can be retargeted
          • Advertising on Facebook and Instagram, you can reach 72% of Americans, 69% of Canadians, 68% of U.K.
          • Those ads will get a substantial message in front of people, like a short email- but in front of 2-3x as many as those who open your emails.
        • If you have an email follow up sequence you need a retargeting ad sequence
        • Best practice is to do both email marketing and retargeting (website and custom lists)
      • People need to hear about you 7 times before they’ll buy. Or is it 17 times. Or 27 times? There are different numbers quoted out there- who’s right?
        • Who cares. It’s more than one time! Most people don’t buy the first time they hear about or visit a brand.
          • Sometimes the first time you go to a website, you’re distracted by something or you get pulled away or you’re not focused on their message or you don’t have time or you’re resistant- but over time with repeated exposures to the marketing message, you hear and “get” the message, or hear about the value and how they solve your problems and the unique benefits of their offering and eventually you come to want that thing.
        • Retargeting helps you stay top of mind until they’re ready to take action so that you’re their first choice when they buy- are you worried about competitors getting all the sales?
          • Without retargeting, when your prospect is ready they might see your competitor’s ad or marketing, and you miss out on the sale. They visited you 3 weeks ago, but your competitor is luckier in their timing (or perhaps your competitor is retargeting) and you lose the sale.
      • Familiarity increases affinity (in social psych it’s called The Familiarity Principle, aka The Mere-Exposure Effect)
        • Studies show that the more we’re familiar with a person or brand, the more we like it.
        • For not very much money you can look like you’re everywhere to the most interested people- they don’t realize you’re not advertising to the whole world this much, so they think you’re a huge deal.
      • One of the two best converting targeting options
        • Along with email subscribers, these are your hottest potential leads.
      • Just spending $1 a day on retargeting means you’re in front of 100 of your best prospects a day- instead of zero of them.

 

  • How do you set retargeting up?

 

      • Facebook Pixel code from Facebook goes on every page of website, every landing page, in your ecommerce cart, checkout, everywhere! (in AdWords it’s called remarketing and it’s in the audiences section of “shared library”)
        • This cookies every user that goes to the site, and grows a list of people who can see your ad. If the cookie is on their computer, Facebook can show your ads.
      • Also custom audiences are similar, and are built from email lists and phone lists- so combining web traffic and opt in lists, you can reach just about everyone who knows your brand

 

  • What kinds of retargeting ads are best?

 

      • Ad type depends on goal-
        • Conversion for ecomm or lead gen with landing pages
        • Leads ads for lead gen with
        • Video views (also can drive traffic)
        • Post engagement
      • Variety- it’s best to have more than one ad, so that people don’t tire of it- when the audience is small they’re going to see it more frequently
      • Things to put in the ads
        • Lead magnet- grow your opt in email list with an ebook, checklist, quiz, etc
        • Sales: Offering related
          • Benefits- what does it do for them? If there’s a lot of this, use multiple ads to get them all across
          • Problems- what problems does your offering solve for them?
          • Unique selling prop- how are you better or different than the competition?
          • Discount- offer a special/secret discount

 

  • How not to be annoying or creepy

 

    • Maybe don’t run ads that acknowledge that you know they’ve been to your site- because they don’t always know how they’ve been targeted
    • Watch your frequency, don’t go above 3 within a week- when your retargeting audience is small, you have to have a smaller budget. It’s often around $10 CPM, rather expensive to do small retargeting audiences but worth it- so if you only have 1,000 people in your retargeting audience early on,
    • Ad variety
      • Have 5-10 ads in the retargeting ad group so Facebook has a number of ads to choose from to deliver variety to people. Pause ads when their frequency is above 3 in a week (unless they’re converting so well that you don’t care!)
    • Exclusions
      • Exclude people who’ve bought- don’t annoy them by showing them the thing they’ve already bought- create an audience of people based on the url of the purchase confirmation page and exclude them based on that or the purchase conversion

REPLAY: 5 Marketing & Sales Funnels Mistakes 99% of Businesses are Making [Facebook Live Show]

Episode SEIS of Live Online Learning (LOL):

To be sure not to miss future live shows, opt in here to join the email list so we can keep you notified!

Here’s what we talked about, in addition to attendee live questions we answered:

  • What IS a Funnel?
    • You may have heard of clickfunnels but that only covers a small part of the whole sales and marketing funnel
    • AIDA: Attention –> Interest –> Desire –> Action
    • Ads –> Landing page –> Content –> Capture/owned media (email/retargeting) –> Sales process
  • What is YOUR Marketing and Sales Funnel?
    • You have a sales funnel even if you don’t know it
    • It’s the steps people take to buy from you
    • Map it out or you won’t know how to improve it
  • #1 Mistake: Too Many Steps in Your Funnel
    • People won’t go too far out of their way
    • People want it to be easy
    • People are easily frustrated
    • How many steps do people have to take to buy from you?
    • How many clicks?
    • How many form fields to fill out?
    • Why the fan-getting process doesn’t work
      • Extra step
      • Fans don’t see posts
      • Still have to pay to get visibility
      • Fan buyer overlap is small
  • #2 Mistake: Not Getting Enough People Into Your Funnel
    • Most businesses aren’t reaching enough people
    • How many people do you need?
      • Do the math
      • Ubiquity
    • Cold traffic
    • Retargeting to get them back
  • #3 Mistake: Not Getting Shares and Virality
    • Don’t sneeze at free exposure and traffic
    • Get more people from the people you already get
    • Is your content valuable enough to get shares?
    • Is it the kind of thing people share?
    • Does it make them look good to share it?
    • Is it easy to share? Share buttons?
  • #4 Mistake: Not Creating and Testing Enough Ideas
    • How many funnels have you created?
    • Are you split testing landing pages?
    • How many new ads have you created this week?
    • If you only have one idea for your funnel, what if it doesn’t work?
    • Russell Brunson says on average with a new business idea they have to try 7 funnels before they create one that’s profitable!
    • When we split test landing pages in lead gen we get 5x the leads
    • Too few ideas leaves you vulnerable to failure and going out of business
    • More ideas means bigger results and profits
  • #5 Mistake: Don’t Be So Inbound and Anti-Push That You Never Close Any Sales
    • Without customers, you go out of business
    • Does your funnel, content and lead magnets pre-sell them?
    • Does it make the sale easier and more likely?
    • Do you ask for the sale or tell them to buy? Are you using calls-to-action?
    • Sell fearlessly. If your thing is valuable and helpful, and you’re focusing on their pains and problems and they’ll welcome it.

 

New Live Series

I’m very excited to announce a new Facebook Live series about how to do better marketing…

And I have a co-host! Video marketing strategist and Facebook Live Diva Kate Volman, who’ve probably heard of from her GoDaddy’s Garage interview series and her work with Jay Baer…

Here’s what it is:

  1. A weekly Facebook Live on teaching you LIVE how to get better results on various social marketing topics. Interact, ask your questions, heckle me, whatever you want.
  2. During each Facebook Live we’ll tell you how to get a super-valuable FREE download checklist, tip-sheet or cheatsheet.
  3. Each week I will give away one seat in my popular Facebook advertising course (The Facebook Leads and Sales Machine, a $997 value)! Some lucky business owner or marketer (who answers the day’s quiz question correctly… you do have to show up and listen and learn first!) will win a free membership to the course.

If you don’t want to miss these live trainings, use this link to opt in and I’ll send you an email when it starts!

Here’s a Facebook Live video about the Facebook live video series 😉

brian.carter.man/videos/10155193147578383

The Top 10 Facebook Ad Mistakes in 2017

blog post headers top10 mistakes cat 3

It sucks when your ads don’t get results. It feels horrible.

It can be accompanied by panic about how much money you spent to find out it didn’t work.

You may not know why it didn’t work. You may not have set things up so that you learned anything from what didn’t work. You may not know what to do next.

I wish every Facebook ad was a success. I wish every Facebook ad campaign worked brilliantly the first time. But that’s simply not realistic.

Even though we’ve had a ton of successes for clients (some of them are here– and there are about ten more super cool case studies I haven’t had time yet to document)…

Michael-Jordan-Quote-1There are many failures, and that’s just part of all digital marketing.

And life, really…

Michael Jordan said, “I failed over and over and over and that’s why I succeeded.”

So your Facebook ad MINDSET is critical…

never-give-upBecause even after you avoid the list of mistakes I’m going to give you below, sometimes you still need to…

  • Gird your loins
  • Steel your nerves
  • Grit your teeth
  • Seize victory from the jaws of defeat

So let’s look at the biggest reasons for Facebook ad failure, starting with the simple and technical and graduating to the biggest and most strategic problems.

Before we get into the list, I have a special freebie for you…

CONTENT UPGRADE ADS WEBINAR

Ok so you opted into that webinar above? Great, let’s get to the list. 🙂

Hey not a big reader? Don’t want to read through this epic blog post? I mean it is 5,800 words long… Watch this video and I’ll talk you through it:

Or just want the short funny summary version? Here’s the ROI vs ROY video (ROI is Return on Investment. ROY is a redneck.):

#1 Insufficient ad testing budget

If you don’t spend enough, you have enough money to test enough ads to find the ads that work super-well, especially if your goals are lead generation or ecommerce sales.

If you really go cheap on your ad budget, you might not find anything that works.

You might run out of money before you get to your goal.

magic-tank

You need enough budget to test at least 50 to 100 ads. At least.

We had a client that we got 2,200% profits for, but it took 160 ad tests to get there, and 76 of those ads DID NOT SELL anything at all.

lafavchart

So if we had only run 76 ads, maybe we wouldn’t have had a single sale!

But one of those ads got 11,800% ROI. Every dollar we spent on it made them $11,800.

Another got 4,000% ROI.

Yes, 150 ads is a lot of work… but it’s worth it.

Sometimes when I look at someone’s Facebook ad account after they’ve said, “Facebook ads didn’t work.”

I see their account only has 10 ads in it and I say, “No, YOU didn’t work.”

You need to do more than that.

What’s the bare minimum you need to spend on Facebook ads?

Most agency folks and consults I’ve spoken to agree that a good start on Facebook ads requires at least $1,000 of spend.

How many things do we need to test? We typically need to run 50-100 ads per product to dial in what is going to work. We need to find the targeting criteria, images and copy that will sell. Some won’t work at all. Some will.

For ecommerce, we can look at your margin and cost per sale and estimate how much we want to spend on each ad before saying it isn’t going to work and turning it off.

  • The more proven the product is (already selling online) the lower that number will be.
  • The newer and less proven it is (hasn’t sold online or hasn’t ever sold anywhere), the higher it will be.
  • If you have a lot products, the more similar they are, the less ads we need to run.
  • The more different your products are, the more ads we need to run, because people will respond differently to them.

Some of your products may be more popular than others. Some may require slightly different targeting. Some may be a good first buy and the others might be better sold as follow-ups via email. None of that is clear at first. It becomes clear over time.

We won’t know what a reasonable cost per sale is until we get an ad that sells. It might be $5, $10 or $20, or more. As we run the ads, we’ll find a number that convert all at different costs-per-sale.

For lead gen, it might be reasonable to go for a $2-5 lead in the business-to-consumer world.

In business-to-business, it could be $10-50 or even higher. And that’s fine when you’re selling things that cost from $1,000 to $100,000 or more.

Running Facebook ads to see what works is kind of like day trading, but you only get info about stocks you trade, and there are no mutuals- you can only buy single companies.

As we discover more ads that are converting, we can revise that cost per conversion target number. If we think $20 per conversion is reasonable, and we need to run a 100 ads, that’s $2,000, just to give you an idea.

The more ads we run, the more we learn and the more ads we find that convert.

This process is a function of the spend more than the time. So if you spend $3,000 in a month or $5,000 in a month, you’ll get there faster.

At the Brian Carter Group, we don’t increase our fees until a client spends $1,000 a day or more (it becomes a lot more work because the ads burn out faster, because the audiences are finite and they’ll all see the ads and tire of them, and stop responding, and the cost goes up, so we have to refresh the creative).

As you might be able to conclude by now, it’s impossible to set an initial ad spend without some degree of guessing. And your budget- the amount of money (hopefully profits from other marketing channels) you have to invest in growing the Facebook channel- plays a part too.

Knowing you need to spend between $1-5k a month gives you an idea what it costs to run a bare minimum professional Facebook ad campaign.

#2 Creating the wrong ad type

I’ve written and spoken extensively and I’ve taught elsewhere about how Facebook has ten different ad types and every ad type is goal-oriented.

adtypes

You could go for engagement or video views or website traffic or event attendance or website conversions, but you have to know what goal you want from these ads and choose the right type.

  • If you boost a post, you’re going to get likes, comments, and shares, but it’s going to be really expensive to get traffic or conversions from that boosted post. If that post has a video in it and you boost it, you’re going to get engagement on that post but not as many video views as you could if you ran a video view ad.
  • If you want to get website traffic you could run the website traffic ad, but a lot of people have run that type of ad and said, “Wow. I got a thousand people to my site but no conversions, no leads, no sales.”
  • That’s because there’s another type of ad for conversions. It’s called the website conversion ad. If you run that one, you have to install the conversion tracking, which is mistake number five. If you don’t have conversion tracking running properly, then the website conversion ad will function like a website traffic ad and only get you traffic.

The reason that that’s so important is that, no matter who you target on Facebook, Facebook will first show your ads to the people within your target group who do the most of whatever your goal is.

targetingbygoal

Let’s say you want to target moms who make more than $50,000 a year. If you boost a post, or promote post engagement, then…

Well, there are a lot of moms who make $50,000 a year (17 million in the U.S.). They can’t show your ad to all of 17 million of them at once, so first they’re going to show it to the ones that they know do a lot of liking, commenting, and sharing. Because you chose the post promoting type of ad. That’s the goal you chose.

And those heavy engagers are not the heavy link-clickers or heavy converters… if you want the latter, you need to choose a different ad type.

If you want to get ecommerce sales from those $50k+ moms, you might run a website conversion ad and send them to an ecommerce site. Then they’re going to show it to the moms who make $50,000 who’ve converted on external websites before.

Do you get the point? They’re going to show it to that subgroup of your target audience that’s done the goal that you’re telling them to do with the ad type you chose.

The dumbest thing you can do is only boost posts and expect to get more than likes, comments, and shares…

fbadmistakelinks

…because that means you’re just not aware there’s nine other types of ads and you haven’t gotten into the Ad Manager or Power Editor and you haven’t created those other types of ads.

You have to get in there and create the right ad type for your goal.

#3 Not creating enough ads (not testing enough targeting or creative)

Our best case studies where we’ve had 2,200% ROI or we’ve gotten incredible results for low-cost leads, and all those kinds of things, and where we prevail with the most difficult circumstances and where we drive the most incredible results are when we’ve created the most ideas and put them in front of customers and we see which ones customers respond the most to.

If you only create one idea, it’s a real crap shoot. The chances that you created that home-run ad is very low.

If you create a hundred ads, there’s a much better chance that you found the right combination of targeting and image and headline that people will go crazy for. Then you’re going to get amazing results.

You’re looking for an outlier…

Statistically speaking, WHEN WEIRD IS AWESOME and awesome is weird.

The way I talk about it is I say look at any sport, like the NBA, where there are some amazing athletes…. people like Michael Jordan, Kevin Durant, Steph Curry and Lebron James.

curry234

(For more cool NBA outlier charts like that one…)

These guys are freaks of nature and have drive and practice and they’re very exceptional people, but they’re only four guys out of millions that have ever picked up a basketball and out of thousands of guys that have been in the NBA.

If the NBA had only ever had four players total, the chances that we’d have those four guys is very low.

When you create an ad campaign and you have an ad account, the more ads you run in there, the more ideas you create and test, the better chance you’re going to have of having something really awesome happen.

The more ideas you put in front of your customers, the better chance you have of them going crazy for one of them.

It doesn’t have to happen all at once.

  1. You may start by testing your targeting, find the right way to target people.
  2. You might test some images, find the best image.
  3. Then you test the headlines, find the best headline.

It might happen over time, one thing at a time. Over the course of time, you’re going to test fifty, a hundred, hundred and fifty, two hundred, maybe a thousand ads at some point.

You get to stop at the point where you decide, “The results are so amazing that I don’t want/need any better.” However, it may burn out at some point, so you should always be testing.

Don’t stop with laziness in the beginning or you’ll lose.

  • You’ll cost your company a bunch of money.
  • Your customers won’t be excited.
  • They won’t care.
  • You’re just not going to do as well.

You have to test a lot of things. You’ll get results while you’re doing it, and you’ll get better and better results as you go.

#4 Putting too many ads into one ad set

The way that Facebook works, if you put ten ads into one ad set, it’s going to figure out which one is performing the best and it might only show that one. It’s going to decide on its own how much to show each ad. It doesn’t really give you any control over how much each ad in the ad set is shown to people.

Like we talked about earlier, there are different types of ads. If it’s a post promotion ad, it’s going to find the ad that’s performing the best for getting engagement and it’s going to show that one the most.

Sometimes it will show the one that doesn’t have the lowest cost per engagement, and you have to do your own optimization and pause the expensive one. That’s part of your job with the Facebook ads.

If you put ten ads into the ad set, some of them may never get enough reach and be put in front of enough people to really be tested. You have to only test two, three, four ads at a time, or they just won’t get enough reach for you to know that they were tested well.

What that means is that, if your ad set is to a certain target and you have all your different ad sets set up by different targeting, sometimes if you want to test a new ad you have to pause a good ad.

You might want to change the name of the ad. You’ve got the name of the ad itself, and then you just append to that, “Restart later.” Pause it and run some new ones and see if they do as well as the best one.

Another approach is to create a new ad set that’s got the same targeting and apportion some specific budget to the new testing.

I’ve got some accounts where we have

  • BEST PERFORMING AD AD SETS
  • TESTING AD SETS

We’ve got a specific amount of money budgeted for testing and a specific amount of money running into the best ads.

That’s a smart thing to do too, because then you’re optimizing your budget. If you were investing, wouldn’t you put most of your money in the stocks with the biggest return?

You could have 80% of your budget going to the best-performing ads and 20% of your budget going to testing new ads.

You should always be testing new ads, because eventually your ads are going to stop working. If you’re showing the same ad to a finite audience, and all audiences are finite, eventually everyone that’s going to like or be influenced to click on that ad or do something with it or watch that video, eventually they’re all going to see it. Some of the people will never respond to it, so the performance is going to go down. It’s going to burn out. The costs will go up.

If you don’t have other ads that you’ve been testing over time that are on deck ready to go into your best-performing ads group, you will have to start over from zero and you’ll have a temporary dip in performance.

It’s not a bad idea to have best-performing ad set and testing ad sets.

#5 Not installing conversion tracking properly and testing it ahead of time

If you’re going to run website conversion ads, you need to have conversion tracking set up with either standard events or custom conversions.

That’s a little technical. I’m not going to explain how to set that up here. Facebook has some great help screens.

I will tell you that we found custom conversions to be more reliable overall than standard events.

You do need to get that set up so that you know which ads are working and which ones are not.

It’s not good enough to track Facebook ads in Google Analytics. You need the conversion tracking from Facebook in your website or landing pages to:

  • Tell Facebook ads which ads are working,
  • So that you can optimize at that level and only run the best-performing ads and
  • Stop the ads that aren’t performing well.

Like I said earlier, if you’re trying to run website conversion ads and you don’t have conversion tracking set up they will run like website traffic ads. Often you will get traffic with no conversions, which is a waste of money.

When you set up the conversion tracking, then you need to test it before running the ads. You don’t want to waste any money, so you need to get the pixel in. You need to check the pixel dashboard and make sure that it’s firing. You need to make sure it’s firing on the URLs that you have it on.

pixeldashboard

You need to, if you do custom conversions, to find that custom conversion by the thank-you page, or whatever confirmation page shows up after the conversion is complete.

If they complete a lead and then they go to a thank-you page, or they buy something and go to a confirmation page, the URL of that thank-you page or confirmation page is your custom conversion URL. You need to set that up, define it, and then make sure that you’ve gone to it again, and then that the custom conversions dashboard says that it’s active.

customconversions

Once you’ve done that, then you can create and run ads that are website conversion ads that work. Make sure you’ve got all that stuff set up and verified ahead of time.

#6 Pushing on what you want rather than following the customer’s lead

This is a mistake I see a lot of businesses make on Facebook, is…

  1. they post something and nobody responds,
  2. the response is very low, and
  3. their reaction is, “Well, we need to advertise that more, because this is an important thing and we want to make sure we hammer this into people.”

That’s the exact opposite response of how you should look at these things.

Facebook is a customer laboratory for you, where you can put things in front of customers and see what they like and see what they’ll respond to and what they won’t. Whether it’s engagement or videos or leads or sales, you can find out what works and what doesn’t.

You’ll do better if you go in the direction of what customers love and what they respond to. If you do that…

  • Your costs are going to decrease
  • Your profits are going to go up
  • Your customers are going to love you more

If you go the opposite direction, where you say, “No. This is our initiative. This is the thing we’ve decided is important. We need to hammer this into customers even though they’re not responding to it.”

  • It’s going to be more expensive
  • You’ll get less results
  • Customers won’t like you as much
  • You’ll seem out of touch because you’re not following their lead

The second one is like having a conversation with someone and not listening. You say something to someone, they don’t like it, and you say it again louder? That’s not how relationships work.

Follow the customer’s lead.

This is a really cool time to be marketing, because for years and years and years we’ve wanted to know, as businesses, what customers like and don’t like. There have been a lot of ways to try to figure that out- through surveys and focus groups and all that kind of stuff.

Every one of those customer discovery methods has flaws.

One of the biggest flaws they have is the customer knows that they’re being asked these things. That’s very different.

How a customer or a person acts when they don’t think they’re being watched, what they will buy, what they will do, is different. It’s more true and it’s more accurate than when they’re in a focus group trying to impress the other panelists or the person asking the question. Or when they’re taking a survey talking about who they wished they were instead of who they actually are.

You want to know how they actually behave, not how they wish or intend to behave.

When we put things in front of customers and they don’t realize it, they’re not really thinking about how we’re monitoring whether they did or didn’t respond to the post or the ad, but we are.

It’s like a top-secret survey they don’t even know we’re doing on them.

While we’re getting Facebook results, we’re also constantly learning from them without them realizing that we’re surveying them.

That’s what Facebook posts and ads do for us, is that they are a huge source of customer intelligence and they’re much more accurate than some of the other methods we’ve had for a long, long time.

#7 Bad copy

That means copywriting. Copywriting is a fundamental marketing discipline.

It’s very important to understand that different phrases and different words affect people differently. There’s been work in this area for over eighty, almost ninety years. People in marketing have been trying to write things that get bigger and better results from customers.

You need to understand the fundamentals of copywriting. There are many books out there, many courses out there, about copywriting.

Beyond that, there’s even psychological research about what words people respond to the most, what words are positive for people, negative, arousing, stimulating, which ones men like, which words women like. There’s a lot of good research out there too.

There are places like BuzzSumo that analyze blog posts that work and don’t.

There’s a lot of data out there, and then you can create your own data. You absolutely should because your customer group is going to be somewhat unique and is going to respond uniquely to your offer and brand, so ask yourself:

  • Which subject lines get them to open your emails?
  • Which blog posts get the most attention?
  • Which ads get the best results?
  • Which posts get the most engagement?

If you’re smart about it and you’ve learned the basics of copy writing, you have thought about what are the benefits of my product or service, what is my unique  selling proposition… there are a whole bunch of fundamental copy things you need to know about your business. If you’ve figured those out, you can test them with Facebook ads and find out what works the best for your customers.

You may start with bad or mediocre copy, but you don’t have to stay there.

Facebook is a customer laboratory, and testing is the process that saves us from ourselves and our bad ideas and our office politics, and it helps us get better results.

#8 Not split-testing landing pages

Fundamental thing to understand about getting results online is that a landing page is anywhere you send somebody. It could be your homepage. It could be a leadpage. It could be a click funnel’s entry page. It could be any webpage. A landing page is the first page they go to. You want them to do something when they get there. Maybe you’re trying to get a lead. Maybe you’re trying to get them to sign up for your email. Maybe you’re trying to get them to register for an event. Maybe you’re trying to get them to buy something. Whatever it is, you’re trying to get them to do something.

You can split test that landing page to see which page gets a better result. What’s the conversion rate? What percentage of people who went there did the thing you wanted them to do?

It’s not as smart to do sequential testing, which means we’re going to have our website look like this for a week, and then we’re going to change it and have it look like something else for a week. Because who knows what happened this week versus last week? Maybe there was a holiday. Maybe there was a national crisis. Maybe the economy went up or down. Things can change in time.

Split-testing allows us to see how people responded to different things at the same time, which eliminates a lot of variables that could screw up our results.

Split-testing is really important. There are a lot of different platforms that allow you to do that. There’s lead pages, click funnels, Unbounce, Optimizely. There are WordPress themes. There’s a WordPress plugin that lets you split test your blog post titles.

Split-testing is a fundamental part of digital marketing. It’s really very similar to testing multiple Facebook ads. You need to have this understanding that the cost per conversion, whether that’s a lead or a sale online, comes from a couple different things: the cost per click, how much did that traffic cost to get there; and then how many people did you have to send there per lead or sale, that’s the conversion rate.

If you can increase the conversion rate or lower the cost per click or both, you lower your cost per sale cost per lead. You increase your profits. These are your two biggest levers.

We’re back to copy writing, images, all those things you put on a landing page, the format, the layout, whether there’s a video or not, what kind of video it is.

Let me add one thing here. When it comes to testing ads, testing copy, testing landing pages, the research says it doesn’t matter how long you’ve been a marketer, you don’t get better at guessing. Your guesses do not get more accurate. You can get better at writing copy. You can get more disciplined at the testing process. You can get more creative. You can get better at understanding customers, but you can’t get more right. You still have to test a lot of different things.

Testing is liberating, too, because not only does it increase our chances of getting higher profits, it’s a profitable activity, but it liberates us from the personal opinion, feeling, emotional, messy side of creativity, where somebody’s attached to the image they like or the headline they wrote, or whatever. If you can get everybody on board with science and say, “Look, these are all great ideas. Let’s see what the customer likes. Using a scientific process, we’re going to find out.”

Then everybody on the team is free to have good ideas and bad ideas. No one has to say, “I’m a good person or a bad person because I had a good idea or a bad idea.” That’s not what it’s about. It’s about a process, trying to understand the customer, and create things, and test things, and get better and better results. It’s just a conversation with the customer where we serve them better and better. Landing pages are a big part of that.

#9 Too many steps before conversion

One thing to understand about digital marketing is the more steps people have to take to get anywhere, the fewer people will get there.

The longer the journey is, the more people die on the way. That’s a horrible analogy.

If you think about email marketing, for example, to get people to buy something  you’d have to get them to open the email, that’s step one.  Before that you have to get them to sign up for your email list.  You have to get them to go to your website to sign up for the email list…

  • Go to the website,
  • Sign up for the email list,
  • Open the email. That’s three steps already.
  • Click on the link. That’s four.
  • Then however many steps it takes to buy the thing on your site. Maybe five, six, seven steps.

That’s email marketing.

How many people open the email? 20%? 30%? That means 70-80% didn’t open the email.

How many people that opened the email click through? Maybe it’s 20%, 30%. Again, you lose another 70-80%.

When they get to the site, how many purchase? A good ecommerce conversion rate is 1% or 2%.

98% or 99% of the people that clicked on your email, went to your site, didn’t buy.

Wow.

You lose most of your people at every step you make them take.

With Facebook, if you have to get a fan, get them to see your post, we know Facebook reach is a problem, get them to click the link in the post, that’s a lot of steps to get them to your site.

You can cut out some of the steps just by having a Facebook ad that sends them directly to the site. You cut out two steps. You didn’t need to get them to be a fan. You didn’t need to get them to see the post. Just running the ad got them to see it.

We know website conversion ads, get better people there to convert. Your conversion rate’s going to be higher. That’s even better.

That’s why fan marketing is broken. It’s partly you might have the wrong people. They might not be buyers. It’s also extra steps.

Having too many steps in your funnel

  • Reduces your conversion rate,
  • Increases your cost per sale,
  • Lowers your profits.

Simplify the customer journey and you increase your profits.

#10 Custom programming and generally reinventing the wheel

Sometimes I see entrepreneurs hire a programmer and have the programmer create things that are not as good as stuff that’s out there. There are a lot of software-as-a-service apps out there. Landing pages are a big one. Have a programmer create a way to buy something on your site instead of just using lead pages or click funnels and plug it into PayPal, or something. You’ve got two obvious SaaS’s that are bulletproof and they always work, as opposed to having a programmer create something that might be buggy.

The problem with programmers is you never know if they’re going to be really good or they’re going to do things on time or they’re going to hold your code hostage or what. There’s a lot of problems there. You don’t know if they’re going to provide good customer service. I heard so many nightmare stories with programmers.

It’s better to find an existing service out there that does something you want them to do than to custom program it.

The other problem with custom programming is that sometimes the stuff you program can conflict with, say, Facebook or Google JavaScript code that’s used for conversion tracking. We’ve had issues where a custom program lead form wasn’t even trackable because the JavaScript conflicted with the Facebook conversion tracking code.

You create a lot of problems for your self by reinventing the wheel and hiring programmers to do custom things that are already out there. Don’t do that. Check and see what’s already out there before you hire somebody.

Uh oh, there’s one more!

THE BIGGEST mistake that will cripple your Facebook Ad Campaigns…

OFFERING SOMETHING NO ONE WANTS

We have sometimes have clients who are entrepreneurs who have a new idea.

It sounds great, it looks great, but we don’t realize until we put it out there nobody wants to buy it.

If it’s a product that no one’s ever bought before, you can test it with Facebook.

Facebook is very affordable- more affordable than Google ads. If it’s a totally new thing, nobody’s searching for it, so AdWords doesn’t make sense.

It might be a new category of things. Nobody’s searching for it, so Facebook makes sense.

Reach the right people, tell them about it.

People go, they check it out.

IF… no matter how you explain it, no matter what you do, you get influencers, you create awesome videos… No matter what you do with it, nobody wants it….

not interested

Sometimes you have a business or a product idea and it’s just a DUD.

The good news is that you can pretty affordably test your new product or business or service idea with Facebook ads.

You can even use Kickstarter to test a product idea without putting out money to create the product… because if no one wants to fund it and buy it ahead of time probably nobody would buy it.

Facebook ads and Kickstarter are really good ways to test an idea ahead of time and not commit a lot of time and money and emotion to something that no one’s going to want to buy.

It’s a tough thing, because

  • You could totally love the idea.
  • You could be super-passionate.
  • You can be convinced your logic is sound that people should want it…

But there’s still a chance that they won’t buy it.

I’ve seen numerous situations where it just totally made sense people should want this thing, but nobody wanted to put money out for it.

I’ve even seen products created from customer surveys where people said they wanted it, but when it came time to purchase, nobody bought.

What people say they’ll do and what they’ll actually do are very different.

Until the cash register rings, you don’t really know for sure.

Save yourself some heartache and some money and use Facebook ads to test the idea.

Just seeing if people will click through at a high rate on the ads for it. If they won’t click through a newsfeed ad, a 1% or a right-hand column ad at 0.1% for it and it’s the right target audience, there’s just not enough interest.

You could do a beta, do a website that’s like, “Check this out. Sign up. Put your email in to hear about it when it’s available,” or, “we’ll give you 20% off when it’s ready.”

If you’re not getting a lot of interest from that, then you got a good indicator there’s something wrong. Something’s not right.

It’s good to know that as soon as possible. You don’t want to invest a lot of time, money, heartache into something that no one’s going to buy.

CONCLUSION

It can be challenging, because there are a lot of mistakes people make. And I see so many businesses make the exact same mistakes over and over. That’s why I write posts like this.

It’s frustrating, because I think a lot of people get excited about things.

They say, “Oh, Facebook ads are going to be great! Snapchat’s going to be great! Live video is going to be great!”

They get very excited about the opportunities, but they don’t see all the traps and pitfalls and mistakes ahead.

I’ve seen so many people make the exact same mistakes and fall into the exact same traps.

My passion is to just tell you guys, as difficult as it might sound, “Here’s some problems ahead of you that you need to avoid.”

I want you guys to succeed. I want you guys to profit. I want you guys not to waste your money.

Please don’t make these mistakes. That is my message to you.

But at the same time…

  • There’s never been more opportunity in business.
  • We’ve never had better data about customers.
  • It’s never been more affordable to try new ideas and get new customers.

So if you’re smart about it, you can succeed with digital and social marketing.

CONTENT UPGRADE ADS WEBINAR