Why B2B Facebook Ads Beat LinkedIn Ads Every Time

Posted on Posted in Advertising, B2B, Facebook Advertising, Facebook Marketing, Internet Marketing Strategy, Lead Gen, Social Media Lead Generation

Some people have it wrong. You- savvy reader- probably already know this, though, right? 🙂

“Facebook doesn’t work for B2B. It’s for B2C,” people say. “Users aren’t on there for work.”

Correct, they are on there to be distracted. “I’m bored,” they say. “Show me something awesome!”

If that awesome thing you show them happens to help with their work, they’ll click on it. That’s what the data tells us about B2B Facebook advertising.

 Why FB works for B2B: FB users want distraction. Show them something awesome that helps their work and they’ll click on it. <– click to tweet

Besides, we live in an era where the line between home and work has blurred.

Here are some of our B2B Facebook advertising case studies over the last 12 months:

  1. An attorney got a case worth $100,000 from Facebook after spending just a few hundred dollars on Facebook advertising.
  2. A cloud hosting company got new business leads from Facebook advertising and a whitepaper for $59 each. The most affordable ads brought in leads at just $29 apiece. The most expensive ones targeted CIO’s and cost $74.08 each.
  3. A new B2B financial industry business discovered their offering wasn’t needed or wanted by the target audience- they discovered this (via extraordinarily low clickthrough rates) with an investment of just a few hundred dollars in Facebook advertising. They saved tens of thousands of dollars by not going further down that dead-end path.
  4. A financial industry event generated 305 registrations at $71.34 each while ads reached 1.5 million people and generated clicks from 18,125 people.
  5. A marketing agency generated new client leads for $29.26 apiece.
  6. An SaaS company used a whitepaper to generate 504 leads and 92 new demo signups for $26 per demo signup. Notable here was that the target was people who worked at Fortune 1000 companies.

Based on our experience above, people do click and opt in for B2B offers while they’re on Facebook.

The 4 advantages that Facebook ads have over AdWords and LinkedIn ads are:

  • Facebook has the largest audience.
    • Google is almost as big, but you can only target people looking for what you have. Facebook lets you target people based on job title, company, etc.
    • LinkedIn is much smaller than the other two.
  • Facebook ads are prominent enough for a lot of people to click.
    • Google also does a good job with this.
    • LinkedIn’s self-serve ads… what’s the last one you remember seeing? Exactly. Unless you spend $10k per month, you can’t use their more prominent “enhanced” ads. So the biggest problem is that your LinkedIn self serve ads don’t get seen and therefore don’t get many clicks.
  • Facebook has the lowest cost per click.
    Facebook clicks are usually below $0.75 and often as low as $0.10.

    • Google ads average over $2.50 per click and can go up to $25.00.
    • LinkedIn ads average over $3.00 per click and often are as high as $6.00.
    • Twitter ads are usually $1.00 – 1.50 each.
  • Facebook ads reward you for trying more ads and targets.
    You can lower Facebook ad costs by 50% or more when you create ads that get higher click through rates.

    • Google ad cost per click doesn’t vary much no matter how you optimizes- less than 10%.
    • LinkedIn ad cost per click doesn’t vary much either.
    • The same is true for Twitter ads.
  • BONUS: Facebook ads can target people by job title, company, seniority, what they majored in at college, net worth, income and nichey jargon. All of these can be used to hit your exact B2B prospect.

So, Facebook ads reach more people, grabs more attention, cost less, and cost a lot less if you work at it.

Now that you know Facebook ads are so effective for B2B, why aren’t you using them for lead gen?

4 Profitable Facebook Posting Tips

Posted on Posted in Facebook Marketing, Facebook Posting, Small Business

1. Write Posts that are Cheerleads for Your Prospects and Fans’ Values and Goals.

The biggest problem with Facebook posts is reach. You need to get your audience to like them, and that means you need to know what your audience values and what their goals are. If you can create a post that cheerleads for those values and goals, you’ll get likes and that gives you more reach.

2. Advertise to Promote Your Posts to Your Prospects

But we feel that ads are needed to promote posts, because if you only have 1,000 fans and you’re only reaching 50-100 people with each post, that’s not enough. What percentage of those 50-100 will come to your website or contact you or come into your physical store? The number of potential customers drops with every step through the marketing funnel, so out of 50-100 people you may only get 5 clicks to your website. That’s not enough. The average ecommerce website converts 1% of visitors, so you need to be getting 100 people at a time to your site, not 5. That’s why ads are necessary, and fans are an increasingly peripheral consideration. promote your posts with ads that target your potential customers, whether they’re fans or not.

3. Reach New People For Free With Shareable Posts

The way reach new customers for free is to get Facebook shares.
(click to tweet that sentence!)

I studied what kinds of posts get shared and which don’t in Contagious Content (free pdf here).

People share posts that are giving (contests), advising (how-to), amusing, inspiring, amazing, or warning (bad weather coming).

People don’t share posts that focus on your company or its employees, are edgy or offensive (except for rare customer groups that are all about those things), are obscure or niche in interest.

When you find that one of your posts is highly likeable and shareable, advertising it will get you a ton more interaction and visibility for a low cost. Our best post ever got us 80,000 likes and 35,000 shares and was seen by 424,000 people for less than a $200 ad spend.

4. Drive People to Your Website

Any post without a link to your website is a wasted opportunity.
(click to tweet that!)

Keeping people on Facebook won’t necessarily help you get sales.

For B2B, blog on topics that help move your prospects toward the decision to buy from you, then post that on Facebook with a link to the post. Then promote that post with ads targeted to your prospects.

The Business Networking Mistake Everyone Is Making On Facebook

Posted on Posted in B2B, Facebook Marketing, Social Networking

I bet you expect me to say it’s talking too much about business on Facebook. No- that’s not the one I have in mind… in fact I see people do that way too much on LinkedIn. They aggressively pitch strangers, and it doesn’t work.

I do think it’s good to network for business on Facebook- with the right people, at the right times.

It’s certainly natural for me to do business networking there. I have more business connections on Facebook than personal ones. I count a lot of those business connections as real friends, too. And we get a lot of clients and some white-labeling work for agencies that way.

Yes, I know… Some people don’t do any business on Facebook. That’s fine.

But if you already do business networking on Twitter and LinkedIn, you should also do it on Facebook.

Facebook makes networking more fun, and it gets you more into people’s real lives. Most people don’t really “live” on Twitter or LinkedIn. They don’t visit it as many times per day. They don’t put as much of their personal life on Twitter or LinkedIn as they do Facebook.

People live on Facebook.

Getting connected with people on Facebook is somewhat like going to their house for dinner. You’re being invited into their personal space.

Most people don’t have more privacy levels in their Facebook than just friends and non-friends. Some people do have an acquaintance level where you still don’t see that much about them. But most people don’t go to that much trouble. That means once you’re in, you’re totally in.

One more thing before I reveal the biggest Facebook networking mistake- I want to differentiate between social media and social networking.

It’s an important distinction I don’t think everyone makes in their minds, but you should:

  • Social media broadly means sharing media on social platforms. Media is content, which is images, video, etc. Content marketing falls under this umbrella. It scales, but can become fairly impersonal.
  • Social networking means meeting people and building relationships on social platforms. It doesn’t scale quite as far, but like real-world networking, it’s a powerful source of opportunities. Other people can dramatically improve your career.

So what’s the biggest mistake people make with Facebook networking?

They don’t make enough information about themselves public.

I don’t care how much info you have on LinkedIn. I don’t care if it’s on your website.

If someone wants to get to know you on Facebook, they need to be able to see a good representation of who you are and what you do.

I can’t tell you how many times people have done a poor job of requesting my friendship on Facebook. Here’s what happens:

  1. They request my friendship…
  2. They don’t message me to say why they thought this was a good idea.
  3. I see we have between zero and 250 mutual friends. I decided somewhere along the line just to accept anyone with 50+ mutual friends. But for the rest, I click to see their profile.
  4. Most of them don’t have any work or education info visible to the public.
  5. Many don’t have much of anything visible to the public.
  6. Some don’t have a real face as their profile photo.

So, I have no idea why you want to be friends, and I can’t find anything out about you quickly. You probably don’t realize how little of your Facebook info is public. You want me to Google you? Forget it.

One of the biggest lessons I’ve learned over and over again in online marketing: You want somebody to do something? Make it easy. Make it less work. Make it less clicks. Because every extra step they have to take decreases your chances of success by at least 50%, if not more.

In other words, you’ve made it hard for me to confirm your friendship. So, you don’t have a chance.

I don’t say this to sound exclusive. It’s just an example to show you how NOT to network on Facebook.

First, go look at your public profile and see what non-friends can see.

This is super easy:

  1. Click on the lock icon in the upper right
  2. Click on “Who can see my stuff?”
  3. Click on “View As”

You’ll probably be surprised how little of your information is public. Now look at that and ask yourself, “If I was looking at this person and didn’t know them, would I want to get to know them? Is there enough visible?”

I recommend you make the following public:

  • Work history
  • Education
  • Places: Hometown, Current City

And if you want to add some flavor, so people can see if you have common interests and get a sense of who you are, make these public:

  • Sports
  • Movies
  • TV Shows
  • Books
  • Apps & Games

That’s it- then when you request friendship from someone, consider messaging them as well! If it says the message will go to their “Other” folder, chances are they won’t see it. But a lot of times, you can send a message directly to them. Do it.

And network away!

The 4 Requirements for Facebook Marketing Profits

Posted on Posted in Advertising, Facebook Advertising, Facebook Marketing

Not every company profits from Facebook Marketing.

But before you blame Facebook, let’s talk. 🙂

It might be you.

Now hang on. This article is based on our experience of what works and doesn’t work for ourclients.

We’ve managed a ton of Facebook marketing. We’ve worked with companies like Dramamine, Chloraseptic, NBC/Universal, Carl’s Jr., PrideStaff, and Humana. And we’ve helped dozens of infopreneurs and small businesses.

We want every client to get them the biggest possible results for their key metric. When the client can make leads or sales the goal, we push for that. Usually, small businesses are focused on leads and sales because they must profit to stay afloat.

Some clients can’t go after leads or sales. There may be a tracking problem. For example, some Consumer Packaged Goods are sold via multiple retail stores. And the brand doesn’t get access to the retailers’ analytics. So they focus on engagement or traffic to the website.

But Facebook can and does produce profits:

The digital marketing industry is beyond the question of whether Facebook marketing can be profitable.

Whether Facebook marketing is profitable for you, hinges on four primary factors:

  1. PROFIT: Do you have the profit margin and cash flow to advertise? And is #4 below providing you the profit to continue to advertise?
  2. TESTING: If you advertise, do you test enough? Are you testing images, headlines, body copy and targeting? Are you creating at least 10-20 new ads a month?
  3. SHARES: If you don’t advertise, do you have content amazing enough to proliferate itself via shares? This one is hard to rely on. Many companies can get additional reach from shareable content. But it’s rare that a company creates a truly viral marketing campaign, especially if they are budget-starved. More often, someone gets several hundred shares and start calling their content “viral” whether it was truly contagious or not.
  4. CONVERSION: Is your website, squeeze page or shopping cart converting at a high enough rate to deliver you an acceptable cost per action?

To succeed with Facebook Marketing, you must do the best practices. Stick to the core elements. What are they?

Facebook changes a lot. But, I wrote recently, we have not drastically changed our Facebook strategy since 2010, except for shifting away from fans toward email acquisition in 2012.

The people and companies who have had to switch Facebook strategies were not focused on core Facebook elements.

The two core elements of Facebook Marketing have always been the newsfeed and advertising.

This is underscored by how Facebook mobile works: Posts only. No tabs.

If you weren’t doing Facebook advertising by 2013, you were behind. The alarm bell that ads would be required for Facebook, and that organic reach wouldn’t be enough, went out early in 2012. If you didn’t hear it, you weren’t paying attention. Facebook ads are essential.

Some people try to avoid ads. I’ve written why every business can and should spend at least $1 a day on Facebook ads. Avoiding ads on Facebook is the biggest Facebook marketing mistake you can make.

In conclusion, we recommend you:

  • Advertise with Facebook
  • Test A LOT of ideas
  • Optimize landing pages and shopping carts conversions

If you do those three things, you’ll have a very good chance of profiting from Facebook marketing!

Facebook Advertising Mistake #94 – Promoting Posts That People Don’t Like

Posted on Posted in Facebook Advertising, Facebook Marketing, Facebook Posting

Own a Facebook page? Your first Facebook ad experience may have been the boost button.

I’m happy you got into Facebook ads!

But chances are you made two big mistakes:

  1. You used Boost instead of the Ad Manager, which gives you more options and power.
  2. You probably boosted a post that wasn’t doing as well as you’d like. That’s the wrong kind of post to promote. You should promote the posts that do well, not the duds.

I understand. I’ve done it. I’ve posted something I loved and then heard…. a thundering silence.

“People should love this post!” I say to myself. “Why aren’t they liking it? I just need to promote it.”

This is a counter-intuitive pearl of wisdom for you:

Facebook rewards you with lower ad costs when your promoted post gets a higher click-through rate. [Click here to tweet this]

How do you know if your posts are resonating? Calculate the percentage of post viewers who liked the post. That’s your engagement rate. It’s should be above 1%. If it’s lower, you’re not creating the best messaging for your audience.

Each of these posts has its engagement rate on it.

See how widely engagement rate can vary? From 0.4% to 8.2% in just these eight posts.

Your Facebook post engagement rate should be over 1%. When you excel, you’ll get 3-7% or more. We’ve seen 11.8%. [Click here to tweet this]

We’ve seen posts get liked by as many as 11.8% of post viewers.

If your post isn’t doing well, it isn’t resonating with your audience. Keep track of what your audience likes and doesn’t like. Put the duds in your “what I shouldn’t do anymore” column. You learned something about your audience. There’s something in that post they don’t care for.

The most common reasons people don’t like posts are:

  • The post is too self-centered. It’s about you or your company. Make it about your audience. What’s in it for them? Focus on the benefits of your service or product to them. Paint a picture of their dream. How awesome will their work or life be like after they’re your customer?
  • The post is too obscure. No one cares that you love the band Rush. Sorry! Enjoy that by yourself.
  • The post is too edgy. Edgy works with certain audiences. But it can backfire and turn people off. They may hate it. They may think liking it publicly would make them look bad. And beware: edgy posts can get a lot of interaction and shares but ultimately hurt your sales.

Find the posts that ARE resonating with your audience. Go for a 3% of those who view it click like on it. Promote those posts.

And by the way, likes correlate more with greater reach than shares do. See the R values in the charts below?

Spend more ad money on the posts that give you the BEST response, not spend more trying to push through the ones people don’t respond to.

The lever Facebook gives us to lower cost-per-whatever with high CTR is dramatic. It’s much more than AdWords gives us. This is why Facebook ads can be so incredibly effective and efficient. You are rewarded handsomely for testing and learning.

I have a post that got 80,000 likes and 35,000 shares for $200 spend. It reached 424,000 people. As soon as I saw that a high percentage of people were liking it and tagging their friends in it, I spent more ad money on it. I was able to get 6 post-likes per penny.

Facebook rewards you for advertising interactive posts. Facebook punishes you with higher ad costs when you promote less interactive posts. That’s going against the flow. Just like Google, Facebook wants you to put out relevant messages. Stop fighting the tide, and go with what your audience wants.

So you’ve created Facebook ads that promote your highly interactive posts. Now what? Duplicate those ads to test 3-5 different ways to target your audience. For example:

  • Different interests
  • Different job titles
  • Different consumer behaviors
  • More or less focused demographics
  • Much wider targeting

You’ll find that testing the targeting will help you get much more affordable interactions, and lower your Facebook advertising costs.

Why Women Are Critical To Every Social Media Campaign

Posted on Posted in Advertising, Facebook Advertising, Facebook Marketing, Social Media Marketing, Social Media Strategy

It was interesting that even in the Facebook discussion of the Superbowl, the top three gender-age demographics were female.

The Facebook campaign with the least commenting we’ve ever seen was for an action-sports-oriented page with 95% male fans. We had focused on building a completely male fanbase, since the client’s experience was that few women purchased their product. But we found out that the result was no discussion at all!

Researchers studied the age-old stereotype that women really are more talkative than men.

Women converse more than men? It depends. Some guys are more chatty. Some guys act like that cliched “strong, silent type.”

Even when you’re marketing in a male-dominated niche, we recommend you also advertise to women. They can be like the “glue players” that hold the team together. Most of us would rather interact in a mixed group, anyway. Some guys don’t want to talk only to guys.

Much as marketers look at 25-55 year old women as the household and healthcare decision-makers, we may want to look at them as central to social media conversations.

There may be a few exceptions- do you want women in your “low T” discussion? Well, maybe you don’t want to discuss that publicly anyway!

And sure, conversation isn’t always critical to social media profits. Too much talk may even get in the way at times. But if it’s important to you, don’t exclude women.

The Funnest & Shockingest B2B Facebook Marketing Podcast Ever

Posted on Posted in Advertising, B2B, Facebook Advertising, Facebook Marketing, Humor, Lead Gen, Social Media Strategy

7Always alotta (I say that’s a word) FUN to be on Kathy’s podcast! Because she’s another business mind who loves to do improv. Therefore, this will both fill your cranium with small explosions of insight AND entertain your limbic system- let’s just say it’ll make your limbic system do “the limbo”.

  1. Why Is Facebook A No-Brainer For B2B Marketing?
  2. Why Do Facebook Ads Beat The Freaking Pants Off Linkedin Ads?
  3. What Are The No Brainer Lead Gen Strategies To Combine With Facebook?
  4. How Do You Use Facebook To Crowd-Source Product And Service Ideas- To Save A Ton Of Money And Heartache?
  5. What The Heck Does More Cowbell Have To Do With Making More Money?

I sure hope this podcast leverages your synergy to paradigmitize your cashflow!

Why Your Dog Can Teach You Marketing

Posted on Posted in Facebook Marketing, Internet Marketing Strategy, Makes Ya Think, Social Media Strategy

briconeI don’t think people are dogs. But we do share some similar cognitive patterns. So, yes you can learn to be a better marketer from your dog. And hey, maybe just maybe if your business relationships are crazy, you should get a dog and learn something!

1. Watch & Adjust

Dogs have a ten-second long memory. To train them, you have to watch constantly so you can respond to what they do right away- or they have no idea what you’re talking about. Similarly, you need to keep an eye on your analytics.

  • What does your heat map look like?
  • What parts of your website are working?
  • What are people doing after hitting various landing pages?

And you can’t just post in social and then forget about those posts. Tweets are available in the average stream for maybe five minutes max. Most Facebook post interaction happens within 30 minutes. So you can look almost immediately and find out whether it’s working or not. That how we do it when we create Facebook posts for companies.

  • What social posts do they like and share?
  • Which ones do they dislike and ignore?

Pay attention and change course as needed. Do more of what works and less of what doesn’t.

This guy figured out how to cuddle with lions by watching and adjusting!

2. Do Something Exciting

enhanced-29522-1403890053-13I used to be super shy and boring. I grew up speaking monotone. I identified with my basset hound and Eeyore was my spirit animal. But learning improv, you have to sometimes pretend to be more excited than you actually are. Turns out, people respond to that whether it’s fake or not! Sometimes I would practice my stand up comedy bits around my dogs, and when I was more enthusiastic, they got into it, getting up, wagging their tails, jumping on me. And they don’t understand that many words, so it wasn’t my wit. Happy tone of voice, high volume, and positive emotion stimulate us on an unconscious level. Facebook is positive because there’s no dislike button. You should be positive, too! People pay for solutions not problems. Sometimes they pay for hope. Also, EVENTS are exciting- even online- event trumps evergreen. More people will give you their email for a webinar they might not attend than for an ebook they might not read. Think about it! If your business needs more leads or an ebook- check us out.

3. Watch What You Do In Their Eyes

dog-watching-tv-o1Dogs are always watching. They try to follow a command because you moved your arms a certain way that goes with that command- even though you weren’t thinking about it. They do the thing they think you wanted and get no reward and that leads to “extinction”- they stop doing it. People may stop doing what you’ve trained them to do if the reward disappears. People always see what you’re doing. That time you ranted political on Facebook? That affected their perception of you. The time you make that off-color joke? That may have turned a bunch of people off. In social media you are always on stage. You may want to think about your persona- if it’s not effective, it might not be intentional and consistent enough.

4. Give And Receive Affection

10557344_10203376617311037_214472521835534640_nI work upstairs. The dogs live downstairs. I go downstairs several times a day, and every time I go down, it’s like Christmas for them. They want to lick my face. They want to jump on me. Dang, I’m a pretty awesome dude then, huh? Especially in social media, telling people you like them is powerful. Show them that you see them by reflecting their interests and values. We all want to be seen and to be loved. Be genuine, be grateful, and express it.

5. Always Reward Them

XlEBLgwYou have to give dogs treats to reward their behavior- then they do those things more often. When we’re inside the house, a piece of dog food is enough, but when we’re outside walking, there are too many distractions and we have to give them the tastier treats. Similarly, when there are more distractions online, you have to be more compelling. Where might that happen? Say in the… Facebook newsfeed? What are some rewards we give people online?

  • Useful, clear, succinct info that helps them achieve a goal – You give them value by telling them how to achieve something
  • Likes on comments – Why do I often like every comment on my posts? I’m happy that they’re participating. I don’t want to play favorites.
  • Favorites on retweets of my tweets – that’s a way to say thanks!

Once customers have already opted into your email or social, they’ll respond okay to weak positive feedback- but to get attention or opt-in initially, you have to give higher value rewards. For example:

  • 10Strangers need high value rewards: People who don’t really know you- they’re distracted, like dogs outside- to get their Facebook page like or their email, promise them something valuable for free, like a useful blog post or a free lead magnet
  • List members and fans will like for a lower value reward: People who follow you in social media- a like doesn’t cost them much, so you can get that by just creating a post that echos their values or beliefs.
  • Fans and followers need high value items if you want a share: Shares are more expensive, because it has to fit their sense of identity and make them look good and be valuable to their friends or followers.
  • To get people to buy, you have to give them something worth at least as much as the cost of the item. In business, it helps if the value seems to be 10-20 times the cost. For example, if I sell you something you really believe could make you or your business $10,000 in revenue, you are more likely to pay $500 to $1,000 for it. Don’t forget too that what they have to do (e.g. installing a CRM or learning and executing your teaching) is also a cost to them which will affect their perception of whether the buy looks like a deal.
  • Buyers need bonuses and they need you to over-deliver if you want to be sure they’re satisfied and will be loyal. Social media itself can serve as a bonus to your customers if you’re giving them value for free.

A lot of what we do for clients, whether with Facebook or Google ads, is make sure the action point is there, and sometimes create more reasons for prospects to contact you and buy.

6. Ask For What You Want

21I was very tentative when learning to command our last set of dogs- “Hey, Brad, listen buddy, hey, if you want to maybe think about coming over here, then that might be really cool…” Obviously they don’t respond well to that. Dogs need short, clear and consistent commands. And people like that kind of clarity, too. In online marketing, you should always know what you want people to do at every step. Ask them to do one thing. Be clear. This is called a “call to action”. Ask for only one thing, because the more things you ask for, the more likely it is they’ll do nothing. That’s why we use “squeeze pages” for lead generation (here’s an example). There is only one option on a squeeze page, and we’re trying to “squeeze” most of its visitors through that action into the next segment in the marketing funnel. You get more results when you ask for just one specific thing. What happens when you don’t squeeze them? Let’s say you send them to your website’s contact page and there are 20 other thing they could click on. Chances are fewer people will do what you want. Cost per lead goes up. That’s bad. Our goal is always to lower clients’ cost per sale and cost per lead.

7. Have Clear Boundaries

Some of your dog’s behaviors are ok and some aren’t. Most likely, you want to potty train them- but other behaviors (like should they be allowed on the couches or to sleep in your bed) are personal decisions. Whatever you decide, be consistent- encourage what you like and discourage the rest. We train people how to treat us, whether we intend to or not. For example, a lot of new consultants will complain that people don’t value their time. When someone asks them to lunch to “pick their brain”, they say yes. Then, for free 29(or for a meal that’s nowhere near expensive as their fee), they answer questions they should be paid to answer. By doing that, you’re training people not to value your feedback very much. Say no. Set a boundary. Here’s how I do it: I don’t phone with any prospective client for more than 15 minutes for free. After that, they’ve seen our services and fees, and they either pay for consulting time or invest in one of our services. Those are the only options. If they don’t like that, they can go try to pick another consultant’s brain for free 🙂

Finally…

7Never forget: I don’t think it’s cool to teach dogs to shake hands… because they have no idea what they’re agreeing to. Like, my dog’s car payment is RIDICULOUS.

7 Lessons Dogs Taught Me About Social Media & Internet Marketing

Posted on Posted in Facebook Marketing, Internet Marketing Strategy, Makes Ya Think, Social Media Strategy

briconeI don’t think people are dogs. But we do share some similar cognitive patterns. So, yes you can learn to be a better marketer from your dog. And hey, maybe just maybe if your business relationships are crazy, you should get a dog and learn something!

1. Watch & Adjust

Dogs have a ten-second long memory. To train them, you have to watch constantly so you can respond to what they do right away- or they have no idea what you’re talking about. Similarly, you need to keep an eye on your analytics.

  • What does your heat map look like?
  • What parts of your website are working?
  • What are people doing after hitting various landing pages?

And you can’t just post in social and then forget about those posts. Tweets are available in the average stream for maybe five minutes max. Most Facebook post interaction happens within 30 minutes. So you can look almost immediately and find out whether it’s working or not. That how we do it when we create Facebook posts for companies.

  • What social posts do they like and share?
  • Which ones do they dislike and ignore?

Pay attention and change course as needed. Do more of what works and less of what doesn’t.

This guy figured out how to cuddle with lions by watching and adjusting!

2. Do Something Exciting

enhanced-29522-1403890053-13I used to be super shy and boring. I grew up speaking monotone. I identified with my basset hound and Eeyore was my spirit animal. But learning improv, you have to sometimes pretend to be more excited than you actually are. Turns out, people respond to that whether it’s fake or not! Sometimes I would practice my stand up comedy bits around my dogs, and when I was more enthusiastic, they got into it, getting up, wagging their tails, jumping on me. And they don’t understand that many words, so it wasn’t my wit. Happy tone of voice, high volume, and positive emotion stimulate us on an unconscious level. Facebook is positive because there’s no dislike button. You should be positive, too! People pay for solutions not problems. Sometimes they pay for hope. Also, EVENTS are exciting- even online- event trumps evergreen. More people will give you their email for a webinar they might not attend than for an ebook they might not read. Think about it! If your business needs more leads or an ebook- check us out.

3. Watch What You Do In Their Eyes

dog-watching-tv-o1Dogs are always watching. They try to follow a command because you moved your arms a certain way that goes with that command- even though you weren’t thinking about it. They do the thing they think you wanted and get no reward and that leads to “extinction”- they stop doing it. People may stop doing what you’ve trained them to do if the reward disappears. People always see what you’re doing. That time you ranted political on Facebook? That affected their perception of you. The time you make that off-color joke? That may have turned a bunch of people off. In social media you are always on stage. You may want to think about your persona- if it’s not effective, it might not be intentional and consistent enough.

4. Give And Receive Affection

10557344_10203376617311037_214472521835534640_nI work upstairs. The dogs live downstairs. I go downstairs several times a day, and every time I go down, it’s like Christmas for them. They want to lick my face. They want to jump on me. Dang, I’m a pretty awesome dude then, huh? Especially in social media, telling people you like them is powerful. Show them that you see them by reflecting their interests and values. We all want to be seen and to be loved. Be genuine, be grateful, and express it.

5. Always Reward Them

XlEBLgwYou have to give dogs treats to reward their behavior- then they do those things more often. When we’re inside the house, a piece of dog food is enough, but when we’re outside walking, there are too many distractions and we have to give them the tastier treats. Similarly, when there are more distractions online, you have to be more compelling. Where might that happen? Say in the… Facebook newsfeed? What are some rewards we give people online?

  • Useful, clear, succinct info that helps them achieve a goal – You give them value by telling them how to achieve something
  • Likes on comments – Why do I often like every comment on my posts? I’m happy that they’re participating. I don’t want to play favorites.
  • Favorites on retweets of my tweets – that’s a way to say thanks!

Once customers have already opted into your email or social, they’ll respond okay to weak positive feedback- but to get attention or opt-in initially, you have to give higher value rewards. For example:

  • 10Strangers need high value rewards: People who don’t really know you- they’re distracted, like dogs outside- to get their Facebook page like or their email, promise them something valuable for free, like a useful blog post or a free lead magnet
  • List members and fans will like for a lower value reward: People who follow you in social media- a like doesn’t cost them much, so you can get that by just creating a post that echos their values or beliefs.
  • Fans and followers need high value items if you want a share: Shares are more expensive, because it has to fit their sense of identity and make them look good and be valuable to their friends or followers.
  • To get people to buy, you have to give them something worth at least as much as the cost of the item. In business, it helps if the value seems to be 10-20 times the cost. For example, if I sell you something you really believe could make you or your business $10,000 in revenue, you are more likely to pay $500 to $1,000 for it. Don’t forget too that what they have to do (e.g. installing a CRM or learning and executing your teaching) is also a cost to them which will affect their perception of whether the buy looks like a deal.
  • Buyers need bonuses and they need you to over-deliver if you want to be sure they’re satisfied and will be loyal. Social media itself can serve as a bonus to your customers if you’re giving them value for free.

A lot of what we do for clients, whether with Facebook or Google ads, is make sure the action point is there, and sometimes create more reasons for prospects to contact you and buy.

6. Ask For What You Want

21I was very tentative when learning to command our last set of dogs- “Hey, Brad, listen buddy, hey, if you want to maybe think about coming over here, then that might be really cool…” Obviously they don’t respond well to that. Dogs need short, clear and consistent commands. And people like that kind of clarity, too. In online marketing, you should always know what you want people to do at every step. Ask them to do one thing. Be clear. This is called a “call to action”. Ask for only one thing, because the more things you ask for, the more likely it is they’ll do nothing. That’s why we use “squeeze pages” for lead generation (here’s an example). There is only one option on a squeeze page, and we’re trying to “squeeze” most of its visitors through that action into the next segment in the marketing funnel. You get more results when you ask for just one specific thing. What happens when you don’t squeeze them? Let’s say you send them to your website’s contact page and there are 20 other thing they could click on. Chances are fewer people will do what you want. Cost per lead goes up. That’s bad. Our goal is always to lower clients’ cost per sale and cost per lead.

7. Have Clear Boundaries

Some of your dog’s behaviors are ok and some aren’t. Most likely, you want to potty train them- but other behaviors (like should they be allowed on the couches or to sleep in your bed) are personal decisions. Whatever you decide, be consistent- encourage what you like and discourage the rest. We train people how to treat us, whether we intend to or not. For example, a lot of new consultants will complain that people don’t value their time. When someone asks them to lunch to “pick their brain”, they say yes. Then, for free 29(or for a meal that’s nowhere near expensive as their fee), they answer questions they should be paid to answer. By doing that, you’re training people not to value your feedback very much. Say no. Set a boundary. Here’s how I do it: I don’t phone with any prospective client for more than 15 minutes for free. After that, they’ve seen our services and fees, and they either pay for consulting time or invest in one of our services. Those are the only options. If they don’t like that, they can go try to pick another consultant’s brain for free 🙂

Finally…

7Never forget: I don’t think it’s cool to teach dogs to shake hands… because they have no idea what they’re agreeing to. Like, my dog’s car payment is RIDICULOUS.

The 12 Good, Bad and Ugly Things About
Facebook Marketing in 2016

Posted on Posted in Advertising, Facebook Advertising, Facebook Marketing, Facebook Posting, Social Media ROI, Social Media Strategy

UPDATED FOR 2016! More tips added… and one of the BAD things is now a GOOD thing!

goodbaduglyfacebook

I had an email subscriber reply to my latest post about Facebook reply to me, “As much as I’m a fan, and have been for a long time, I’m starting to wonder if I can trust you. You never say anything negative about Facebook… I’m a fan of factual and logical articles, as opposed to the Avinash Kaushik cheerleader approach.

I admit, I am not a headline-grubbing attack-writer… that’s how some writers get attention. And I know that it’s popular to attack Facebook right now. But I’ve never been a trend follower, unless it makes sense to me.

I do not say everything about Facebook is good. I never have. I am more likely to disparage (without naming names) gurus and companies that recommend Facebook strategies that don’t work as well as others. I was never big on Facebook tabs, while some companies based their monetization strategies around them. I wasn’t surprised when Facebook diminished their role in the ecosystem. I’ve always recommended advertising as part of your Facebook strategy… so I feel like I’ve been ahead of the curve and balanced in my assessment of Facebook and its options for about four years now. To be fair, you would have had to read all my articles everywhere and my books and ebooks to get that.

Facebook is transformative for all of us- it teaches you that the positive, constructive approach (which can sound like cheerleading, I suppose?) works better than the negative one. It’s an interesting topic- I am about to go present to NBC Affiliate TV station Creative Directors, and they are on the front lines of the news vs. social media struggle… which, if we want to be reductive, is negativity vs. positivity… exemplified by Local man mug shots vs. cats, dogs and bacon.

Also, my focus is exclusively about how to get results from Facebook as a marketing platform. You’ll never see me talk about a Facebook Security issue, because that’s more of a user issue, if it really is an issue.

I think the real problem is that Facebook is easy to do poorly- and many businesses don’t put enough time and training into it. So they feel like they’ve wasted their money. They probably have, because the companies that don’t succeed with Facebook marketing are lukewarm about it and go with half-measures. They don’t allocate enough time or money to it. They shut their brains off when they hear anything too complicated about how to get results. I’m still trying to make Facebook marketing more simple and more certain than it is- but there’s only so far you can go. There’s only so much of the learning curve we can short-cut.

The information about how to get results with Facebook is out there- if you haven’t found it or learned it, don’t blame Facebook for your lack of results. BOOM! 🙂

So here’s a list for you… the good, the bad and the ugly. And let’s do that in reverse order, since in order to be credible I have to attack one of the platforms I recommend? Yep, that was sarcasm 😀

Facebook: The Ugly

  • No customer support for companies they haven’t identified as strategically important.
  • Some companies sunk a ton of money into fans, assuming (even though it has never been the case and Facebook never promised this) that they would always be able to reach those fans for free. Emails are more valuable than Facebook fans.
  • If you don’t know what you’re doing, you can waste a ton of advertising money and not get any profits. This is also true about Twitter, and to a lesser extent AdWords and Bing. (LinkedIn is just hard to even get a lot of clicks from.)
  • Facebook traffic won’t show accurately in Google Analytics without URL parameters, and you have to do custom javascript to track conversions if you’re using Facebook Connect to get leads.

Facebook: The Bad

  • There is a sharp learning curve for Facebook marketing, even if you already know how to do other types of digital marketing well. Facebook is a different medium, so you will have to market and communicate differently on it than other platforms. The ad platform is quite different from AdWords and Bing. One way I address that is with my Social Marketing Profits course.
  • Facebook marketing requires even a professional at least 5-10 hours a week of work, if you’re doing best practices. That includes time for advertising, posting and customer analysis.
  • Not every business gets satisfying results from marketing on Facebook. (But this is also true of AdWords, Bing, Twitter, LinkedIn- and every marketing option…)

Facebook: The Good

  • Biggest social media platform in the Western world- over 1.5 billion potential customers for you to reach. TV-sized reach. In many countries, more than 50% of the population uses Facebook.
  • Advertising with the most sophisticated targeting we’ve ever seen (infinitely better ad targeting than TV or radio). Even B2B targeting like job titles are available. In the U.S. you can also target people by income, net worth, home value, lines of credit and more.
  • Costs are 32x more affordable than TV or radio, and you can start for just $1 a day. Super-smart for businesses who can’t afford the huge TV ad campaigns. And Facebook is the ONLY ad platform that rewards you financially for finding your customer’s passions. When you find the right targeting, images and ad messaging your costs plummet and your profits skyrocket. This is a major reason Facebook gets the lion’s share of companies’ social advertising budgets.
  • Facebook is fundamentally positive, with no dislike button, so major PR problems are less likely to happen on Facebook than any other social platform. You can block people who prove they are troublemakers and aren’t good prospects. When you develop a passionate following, your fans will jump to your defense against online critics.
  • Facebook gives you the ability to learn more about your customers than you’ve ever known, which means you’ll be able to do all your marketing in all channels, even traditional ones, better than you could before. Audience Insights gives you over $10k in market research info for free.
  • I MOVED THIS FROM THE BAD CATEGORY TO GOOD. Facebook changes its features frequently. Any programmer can push things live. They’re trying to be agile and improve performance based on data, but users hate change and unhappy people sometimes are more vocal than happy ones. Still, one reason Facebook has succeeded more than other social platforms is that they try a lot of new features and offerings to help businesses win, and keep what works. That means the Swiss Army knife of marketing that is Facebook occasionally gets some new cool tools. If you’re already there, if you’ve invested the time and money to get it to work for your business, it’s easy to use the new things too.